Will Globalization Destroy Black America?

Will Globalization Destroy Black America?  Ummm This is a very interesting op-ed.  I encourage you all to read it and give me some feedback.  At first I thought the enitre piece was on point.  But After reading Afripino’s comments, there may be some problems with this.  Joe Madison had talked about this on his show this morning.  I need to research this to make sure it is authentic.

Update:

Well it is authentic as its author has commented on my blog.  I think one thing we all can agree on, if we don’t do a complete shift in thought and direction, our people will be left behind completely.  Education is the key and it needs to be reinforced in the home so that it can offset or aid what is being taught in the schools.  Koreans, Greek and Jewish people have schools for their children to set the foundation, it is time that we do the same for our children.

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10 Responses

  1. What is “Black America”?

    The author, whom I doubt is “black”, makes sweeping generalizations about Black America that beg the following questions:

    – Are all persons residing in his so-called “Black America” similarly situated? Think about it, there are many blacks who have benefited from globalization. There are many blacks who have not even attempted to improve themselves. Yes, they both live in America, but I don’t think they’re similarly situated. Plus, what about mixed-race people? Are they legal U.S. residents but green card holders in Black America?

    – Does globalization have a disproportionate impact on “Black America” and, if so, does it have a similar disproportionate impact on blacks that do not fit within his definition of “Black America” (e.g., Caribbean-born or Black British or mixed-race blacks).

    – If Black America unthinkingly depended on the American education system to educate its children and, as a result, have fallen way behind, why isn’t there a similar negative impact on whites and Asians who “depended on the American education system to educate its children”?

    – Why would an African-American trust the words of a writer who summarizes black life as the sum of “diversions of mind-deadening entertainment, useless sports, hyper-sexuality, excessive social celebrations, pointless conversations and debates, meaningless media and the civil rights issue de jour approach to managing our problems”? (Note: This is why I doubt that the writer is black).

    – When he says blacks must “re-establish the Black family as the primary and most important social unit of our culture and society” does he mean that the Black family was once the “most important social unit of our culture and society”? If so, does he mean African culture and the global society, or does he mean American black culture and American society? Either way, what is the basis (i.e., evidence) for his conclusion that the black family was ever the primary and most important social unit of our culture and society?

  2. You bring a new perspective to this. I never asked those questions when I read this

  3. My name is Phillip Jackson. I am the author of this commentary. I am Black. I grew up in public housing in Chicago. I live on the south side of Chicago. I am Black. My mother was Black. My father was Black. My wife is black. My son is black. My daughter is Black. My grandchildren are Black and Latino. Did I pass the test?

    What is the sweeping generalization that I am making when only 35% of Black boys in Chicago graduate from high school?

    What is the sweeping generalization when 47% of non-institutional Black men in Illinois are not working?

    What is the sweeping generalization when near 70% of Black children are born into single parent, female headed house holds?

    What is the sweeping generalization when young Black women are the fastest category of people contracting HIV-AIDS?

    What is the sweeping generalization when brothers are going to Cook County Jail and state prisons like they giving way something?

    I don’t believe that the person who is questioning these statistics has done his or her home work. Maybe that person is not Black. It doesn’t matter whether they are Black of not. What matters is if what they are saying is true or not.

    Too many Black people ignore the facts and defend their opinions. Everybody is entitled to their own opinion. Even if it means that we disappear.

    People like this are our real problem. Here we are, drowning, going down for possibly the last time and brother man wants to see how long we can hold our breath! Better teach them brothers how to swim. Or at least to tread water!

    We live in a time of educate or die! This ain’t no joke!!! If this brother lives with Oprah, he will be fine. But if he lives on my block, in my community, or almost anywhere in Black America, he is in trouble, along with me.

    He does not have to admit it for it to be so. History is replete with those who were in denial up until their demise.

    I leave you and the Brother with “Educate or Die!” And not that old whack education that you get in the universities. We had better get the kind of education that will keep us on this planet. We had better take education to the streets and to the prisons. Or it was nice while it lasted. Get with the program, bro.

    Phillip Jackson
    Educate or Die!!!

  4. Well Mr. Jackson has responded. Let’s havea constructive dialouge about this issue; it is well worth it

  5. Native Son,

    Thank you for this opportunity to express my opinion and to share some factual information on our plight.

    Phillip

  6. Mr. P. Jackson’s commentary is right on. If we as a black people dont start changing the way about the way that
    we do things we just might become obsolete.

  7. “I don’t believe that the person who is questioning these statistics has done his or her home work. Maybe that person is not Black.”

    Ahhh yes, the “question the blackness of the critic” argument (aka the “He ain’t black, so he can’t be right argument’). It is usually used when the responder has no substantive evidence to support his position.

    First, it should be noted that my response did not question the validity of the dire circumstances that face black males. However, a close read of my previous post would reveal that my questions relate to the author’s definition of “Black America” not the dire consequences facing black men. His response did not address his use of a broad definition and broad mischaracterizations to describe the lifestyles of all black Americans.

    Second, Mr. Jackson’s statements that we need to be educated with something “other than that old whack (???) education that you get in the universities” and that “we had better get the kind of education that will keep us on this planet” is different from what he is saying in the article. Now he appears to be saying that black folks need some form of non-traditional education (i.e., that education not taught in traditional universities) to “keep us on this planet.” “Keeping us on this planet” is separate and distinct from succeeding and thriving on this planet. Indeed, we could be kept on this planet as slaves. Similarly, the use of black or urban slang (i.e., “whack”) is an example of laziness or intellectual deficiencies that can keep us on this planet in a mental ghetto by maintaining perceived weaknesses among black folks with respect to formal communications.

    Third, his article implied that blacks are so far out of the mainstream because of “diversions of mind-deadening entertainment, useless sports, hyper-sexuality, excessive social celebrations, pointless conversations and debates, [and] meaningless media.” Yet, he now wants us to go further outside the mainstream by embracing some form of education that will be taught outside the traditional academic system. His response ignores the fact that many proponents of globalization and many benefactors thereof were educated in U.S. institutions. He should be asked to describe this non-traditional education system for us. Will it give us the business and technical skills necessary for survival or will it teach us that we’re the chosen ones because the Black family once was (in his view) the primary and most important social unit of our culture and society?

    Fourth, it should be clear that Mr. Jackson did not answer any of my questions. Rather, he took out his rifle of emotion and attempted to shoot the messenger of constructive criticism. Unfortunately, he missed the target and, in doing so, further weakened the content and message of his original article.

    Lastly, it should be noted that I commend Mr. Jackson’s efforts for trying to do something. My comments, although not specifically directed at him, can be used to refine his message. Unfortunately, Mr. Jackson appears to be playing a zero sum game in which only one view may reign supreme: HIS. If he views constructive criticism as a source for refinement of his message, there is at least the possibility that he will be able to do more for all of his brothers, even if he doubts that I am one or a citizen in his Black America.

    Afripino

  8. “If this brother lives with Oprah, he will be fine. But if he lives on my block, in my community, or almost anywhere in Black America, he is in trouble, along with me.”

    One last point.

    Again, Mr. Jackson weakens his credibility by making conclusions about someone that he does not know. He is basically saying that if I’m not related to one particularly wealthy black person, I’m in the same boat as the the people on his block. Yet, my family embraced education one generation ago. My father shoveled horse manure on horse farms in Kentucky and lied about his age to join the military. My mother survived a world war in her own county. My siblings and I followed my father’s advice and completed our bachelors degrees (his minimum standard for success). I’ve went on to complete two masters degrees and a law degree at the best institution in Washington, D.C. I am confident that my family and I are positioned to thrive in the global marketplace. As evidence, I am employed by a firm that does business 24 hours a day because we have offices and clients in the U.S., Europe and Asia.

    Am I in the same situation as the men you refer to on your block? No. Will globalization affect me the same way as it will the brothers on your block? No. Why? Because I took advantage of the educational process and because I am proactive with respect to managing my family’s future. At an early age, I followed Malcolm X’s advice and I woke up, I cleaned up, and I stopped begging anyone to control my destiny. Other black folks in your Black America have done the same thing. Will they be affected the same way as people on your block? No! It is illogical, inaccurate and disrespectful to think that progressive black folks, black professionals, and blacks that don’t buy into the politics of victimhood will be affected by globalization in the same way that one of the brothers on your block in Chicago will be affected. The mere fact that you lump us all into the same basket shows limited knowledge of the people for which you are self-appointed to lead. The mere fact that you are not aware of opportunities for well-educated black males shows how out of touch you are. For example, I have two nephews that matriculated through Morehouse College and they have had their choice of jobs at the top firms in N.Y., D.C., and Atlanta. The eldest works at a top tier accounting firm, and they are paying for his masters in accounting at a prestigious school in the midwest so that he can become a CPA. Is he in the same situation as the brothers on your block. No!

    As I’ve stated on one of my previous posts, it’s bad if black folks are miseducated by white folks, but I think it rises to the level of black on black crime when black folks are found guilty of the miseducation of an American negro.

  9. Afripino,

    Your comments to Mr. Jackson’s reply, although poignant, stirs within me some mixed emotions. For example, your point regarding Mr. Phillips usage of the term “Black America (n)” does, legitimately, demand that we think more critically about the way we classify particular groups of people. I also agree that we need to be careful not to make broad generalizations about the conditions facing “Black Americans” due primarily to the fact that “our” experience in this country is varied, unique, and often times so complex that it does will not fit as neatly into the Black/African American box as we think it should. (Can you say Barack Obama?)

    However, it was your later points that I found the most interesting, frustrating and disappointing. While you imply that those who share the same reality that Mr. Phillips describes in his response as having bought into the “…politics of victimhood”, you, in describing your ascension the top, sound like someone who has bought into the “delusion of the (Black) Middle class”, who presuppose that success “lies at the end of the tunnel” for all those who follow a particular path. The equation is as follows; [parents work hard (+) send children to college = success for children] and it just doesn’t work that way. Theoretically, yes, we in America should all have access to the same opportunities, yet who is to say that when we are exposed to, or take advantage of, these opportunitities that the outcome will be the same? This is the same logic used by ignorant, gullible and often times racist White Americans when seeking to explain why “certain” people (particularly Blacks folks) have failed to achieve material success.

    Further, your criticism of Mr. Phillips use of the term “whack” as “… an example of laziness or intellectual deficiencies that can keep us on this planet in a mental ghetto by maintaining perceived weaknesses among black folks with respect to formal communications.” reeks of elitism and the kind of intellectual supremacy I experienced among my white professors and colleagues at the University Pittsburgh, who like you, seemed “out of touch” with how integrated “Hiphop culture” has become with American “pop culture”. “Hiphop vernacular” can now be heard in the boardrooms of some of America’s top advertising companies as demonstrated by the numerous commercials that deploy it. Likewise, the usage of “Hihop vernacular” has become wide spread within Western academia, and more importantly, among some of our leading Black intellectuals like Professor Micheal Eric Dyson, Dr. Cornel West and Tavis Smiley, just to name a well known few.

    Finally, you mentioned Malcolm X as someone who was pivotal in helping you raise your consciousness. Least we forget Malcolm X gave his life while attempting to transform the very system that has afforded you the privileges you have today. Malcolm X further understood that the barriers that stand in the way of Black “self determination” (the philosophy he carried to his grave) are both internal and external. He understood, as you have, that each individual has a responsibility to raise their social and moral consciousness and challenge themselves to always do better instead of blaming others for their problems. While at the same time, Malcolm X remained keenly aware of how flawed America’s socio-economic and cultural institutions were and how many of these institutions were designed so that individuals who lack certain types of privilege and access are doomed to fail (Note I’m defining privilege as something that is not earned). Mr. Phillips is speaking “for” individuals that don’t have access to the resources, or privileges that globalization has created and continues to create, at an astounding rate. While at the same time he is speaking “to” individuals like you have “made it” so to speak, with the implied question being; what are you going to do to ensure that equality exists such that others, not just you and your family, “… are positioned to thrive in the global marketplace.”

  10. My criticism of “hip-vernacular” reeks of elitism and the kind of intellectual supremacy I experienced among my white professors and colleagues at the University Pittsburgh, who like you, seemed “out of touch” with how integrated “Hiphop culture” has become with American “pop culture”.”

    — Just because hip-hop is integrated into hiphop culture or American pop culture does not mean that I should accept hiphop vernacular. If using proper English rather than hiphop vernacular makes someone an elitist and intellectual supremacist, than call me “Afripino – the elitist and intellectual supremacist.” I’m not trying to come down to your or Lil’ Wayne’s level so that I can fit in with American pop culture. I refuse to allow myself or my child to be dumbed down to accepting linguistic laziness rather than intellectual prowess.

    “Hiphop vernacular” can now be heard in the boardrooms of some of America’s top advertising companies as demonstrated by the numerous commercials that deploy it.

    — Because corporate America loves the fact that a significant portion of the so-called Black America is consumption-focused rather than investment-focused. They know that they can use hiphop vernacular, basketball stars and Lil’ Wayne to sell YOU stuff because you will believe that–because of their use of HH vernacular–their products are “down” (is that current hip-hop vernacular) with the “brovas” (How’s that? Do I seem less elitist now?).

    “Likewise, the usage of “Hihop vernacular” has become wide spread within Western academia, and more importantly, among some of our leading Black intellectuals like Professor Micheal Eric Dyson, Dr. Cornel West and Tavis Smiley, just to name a well known few.”

    — Michael Dyson and Tavis Smiley appeal to hiphop heads because that is their primary market. If Thus, they need to satisfy their target audience (in a corporate way, not necessarily a substantive way). Indeed, Cornel West used hip-hop to bridge the gap between intellectual heavyweights like himself and the greater hip-hop community. However, if you read some of Dr. West’s books, you will notice that he does not dumb himself down for “American Pop Culture” purposes. You will not see any “youknowhumsayin’s” or “ya herrrrd me!” or “Holla at a brova” anywhere in the book. I should also note that Messrs. Smiley and Dyson are interesting commentators, but I’ve never considered them to be leading intellectuals like Dr. West.

    Lastly, in response to your question, “what are you going to do to ensure that equality exists such that others, not just you and your family.”

    — For starters, I’m not going to enhance negative stereotypes of black folks by being linguistically lazy, dumbing myself down because no matter what I do, “The Man” won’t let me get ahead or by accepting a form of music-based Ebonics (i.e., HH vernacular) so that I can be “keepin’ it real” instead of being labeled as elitist.

    Afripino

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